ACADEMIC BOARD MEETING

13 April 2004

 

 

BG H.S. CARTER

COL I.S. METTS, JR.

COL. D.J. FALLON

COL A.J. FINCH

COL K. HENSON

COL M.A. BEBENSEE

COL D.T. OUZTS

COL P.B. EZELL

COL K.P. BRANNAN

COL J.R. BLANTON

COL B. MOORE, JR.

COL. L.W. MORELAND

LTC P.M. ROSENBLUM

LTC J.S. CARTER

LTC S.A. NIDA

LTC J.I. MOORE, JR.

LTC J.W. PEEPLES

COL P. REMBIESA

COL A.W. LECLERCQ

COL R. WHITE

COL J.B. MCMILLAN

CDR J. SNIVELY

     For COL R. TICE

MAJ A. BEDDINGFIELD

MAJ L.A. ZURAW

MAJ S. NESMITH

LTC G. FEURTADO

 

 BG Carter called the meeting to order at 1515.

 

AGENDA ITEM # 1: APPROVAL OF MINUTES 16 MARCH 2004

 

The minutes of the 16 March 2004 meeting were approved as submitted.

 

 AGENDA ITEM # 2: CURRICULUM CHANGES

 

LTC Gardel Feurtado presented the following curriculum changes with recommendation for their approval from the Curriculum and Instruction Committee:

 

Department of Biology

 

Two new courses, toxicology and human genetics, were proposed.

 

BIOL _____    Toxicology                                                                   Four credit hours

Prerequisites: BIOL 102 or 140 and CHEM 104 or 162, or BIOL 318

 

An overview of the basic science of poisons, including the disposition of chemicals in the body, the role of metabolism in enhancing or reducing their toxicity, mechanisms of toxicity and the effects of toxicants on major organ systems.

 

Lecture: three hours; Laboratory: three hours

 

BIOL ____      Human Genetics                                                           Three credit hours

Prerequisite: BIOL 101

 

This course will introduce students to a variety of genetic issues that they will encounter during their lives including 1) the genetic basis of disease, 2) genetically modified organisms, 3) genetic screening and prenatal diagnosis, 4) cancer, 5) human genome, 6) genetically modified organisms and 7) DNA fingerprinting.  In addition to gaining a scientific understanding of these issues, the ethical and societal impact will be discussed.

 

Lecture for Biology non-majors: three hours

 

Changes in course name and catalogue description were presented for BIOL 203, Survey of the Plant Kingdom and BIOL 209, Man and His Environment.

 

BIOL 203 Survey of the Plant Kingdom

 

Change name to “Introduction to Plant Biology” with the following course description:

 

An introduction to the structure and function of nonvascular and vascular plants, including the characteristics, life cycles, physiology, evolution, ecological importance and economic value of each plant group.

 

Lecture: three hours; laboratory: three hours

 

BIOL 209 Man and His Environment

 

Change name to “Environmental Science” with the following course description:

 

Human impact on our environment has never been so intensive or so far-reaching.  Fundamental conditions in global nutrient cycling, biological diversity, atmospheric composition, and climate are changing at an unprecedented rate.  This course will use real world case studies to investigate the complex interactions among ecology, geology, chemistry, ethics, policy, and economics.

 

Lecture: three hours

 

The new courses and the course changes were approved without opposition.

 

Department of English

 

An interdisciplinary minor in Leadership was proposed.  This minor will be housed in the Department of English but will include courses in the Departments of English, History, Political Science and Criminal Justice, and Psychology and the School of Business Administration.  The Minor in Leadership will consist of five required courses (15 credit hours total) – one each from the Departments of English, History, Political Science and Criminal Justice, and Psychology and one from the School of Business Administration.

 

            This minor includes the following new courses:

 

Department/School                            Course

Business Administration                       BADM 371     Leadership in Organizations

English                                                ENGL 371       Literary Paradigms of Leadership

History                                                HIST 371        Historical Studies in

                                                                                   Leadership

Political Science/Criminal Justice          PSCI 371        Leadership in Politics, or

                                                           PSCI 305        American Presidency

Psychology                                          PSYC 371       Psychology of Leadership

 

Total Credit Hours Required – 15, at least 9 of which must be completed at The Citadel

 

School of Business Administration:

 

BADM 371      Leadership in Organizations                              Three credit hours

Prerequisites: Junior Standing: Completion of PSYC 371 or BADM 328

 

Using a case approach as well as a significant experiential component, this course involves the application of leadership theory and practice covered in this class and in other classes in the interdisciplinary minor in Leadership.  The course draws from cases in business and other organizations to focus the student’s learning in both individual and team projects.  Issues of motivation, persuasion, ethics, power, diversity, teams, etc. will all be explored.  Guest speakers/leaders will also be an important component of the course.

 

Lecture: 3 hours

 

Department of English:

 

ENGL 371       Literary Paradigms of Leadership                      Three credit hours

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENGL 101, 102, 201, and 202/215/218/219.

 

A study of literary texts from various times and cultures that present models of leadership, both good and bad, and raise issues about leadership characteristics and responsibilities.

 

Lecture: 3 hours

 

Department of History:

 

HIST 371         Historical Studies in Leadership                         Three credit hours

Prerequisites: Core History Sequence

 

Case studies in how different eras and cultures have envisioned good leadership and of how significant people have embodied its qualities.  Examples include: Ethics and Leadership in the Classical World, Founders of the American Republic, Great Military Commanders, and Civil Rights Leaders of the Modern World.

 

Lecture: 3 hours

 

Department of Political Science/Criminal Justice:

 

PSCI 371         Leadership in Politics                                        Three credit hours

 

This course is a survey of political leadership, considering the elements of causation, constraint, and consequences of leadership response to challenges within and outside political institutions.  A central theme is the interplay of issues of ideas of duty, conscience and ethics with more rational calculations of strategy and advantage.  The readings are drawn from across the social sciences and history, aiming for analytical and comparative overview of the notion and practice of political leadership.

 

Lecture: 3 hours

 

Department of Psychology:

 

PSYC 371       Psychology of Leadership                                 Three credit hours

 

This course examines leadership theory and contemporary trends in leadership, organizational behavior, and the management of human resources as they are related to the emergence and effectiveness of leaders.  With the areas of social psychology and organizational behavior providing its conceptual and empirical foundation, the course focuses on leadership behaviors and processes in organizations.  Through the examination of leadership theories, issues, and exercises designed to enhance interpersonal skills and leadership abilities, this class will provide insights into opportunities and challenges faced by leaders as they seek to adapt themselves and their organizations to a global environment.

 

Lecture: 3 hours

 

The minor in leadership was approved without opposition.

 

 

Department of Political Science and Criminal Justice

 

The following changes were presented:

 

PSCI 461 is changed to “Issues in Contemporary Constitutional Law” with course description as:

 

“A study of selected cases and issues in U.S. constitutional law relating to contemporary controversies in American law and politics.  The specific issues and case studies may vary from semester to semester.”

 

The following new courses were presented:

 

CRMJ 392       Computer Crime                                                           Three credit hours

 

This course explores the current state of computer crime within the United States, while tracing the history of technological crime and identifying areas ripe for exploitation from technology savvy deviants.  It also evaluates forensic practices and software in light of government legislation, while providing a thorough analysis of emerging cases.  Finally, the course outlines comprehensive guidelines for the development of computer forensic laboratories, the creation of computer crime task forces, and search and seizures of electronic equipment.

 

Lecture: 3 credits

 

SOCI 301        Cults                                                                            Three credit hours

 

This course is an examination and analysis of alternative religious ideologies and groups.  Attention will be given to defining and explaining cults, and a historical analysis of the phenomenon will be undertaken.  A sociological examination of their impact on social norms and ideologies will be discussed; government reactions to cults and cult activities will also be addressed.

 

Lecture: 3 hours

 

Several modifications were also presented in the list of courses that qualify as Cluster A and Cluster B courses.

 

All changes and the new courses were approved without opposition.

 

 

AGENDA ITEM # 3: NEW GPR STANDARDS

 

BG Carter presented revised GPR requirements for a variety of activities and standards.  The College will assess the impact of the new standards after they have been in operation for one full year.  This analysis will include a comparison of grade point ratios before and after operation, a comparison of the number and percentage of cadets dismissed, on probation, and in good standing.  Adjustments will be made as necessary.

 

Current GPR Standards

(Catalog, page 34)

 

Total Hours                  Continue on Probation              Good Standing

0-39                             1.100                                                   1.300

40-69                           1.400                                                   1.600

70-99                           1.700                                                   1.800

100+                            1.900                                                   2.000

 

Proposed GPR Standards

 

Total Hours                  Continue on Probation              Good Standing

0-39                             1.300                                                   1.700

40-69                           1.500                                                   1.800

70-99                           1.700                                                   1.900

100+                            1.900                                                   2.000

 

Proposed GPR Consequences

 

(1) Honor Court Elections (Spring Jr. Yr.)                                 2.X*

(2) BVA (Spring Jr. Yr.)                                                           2.0

(3) Summerall Guard (Fall Sr. Yr.)                                            2.0

(4) Rank                                                                                   2.0

(5) Pass on a weekday                                                             2.0

(6) Club Sports                                                                        Good Standing

(7) Special Leave                                                                     Good Standing

(8) CP (Seniors)                                                                       Good Standing

(9) Academically Proficient                                                       Good Standing

 

            *X will be determined by the 2004/2005 Honor Committee

 

All classes will be informed during the 2004-05 academic year that all changes will go into effect in fall 2005.

 

All changes were approved without opposition.

 

 

AGENDA ITEM # 4: DISCIPLINARY BOARD OF REVIEW

 

BG Carter reported that the Board of Visitors had approved an additional appeal in cadet disciplinary procedures potentially leading to suspension, dismissal, or expulsion.  This step parallels the honor board of review.  It is expected that the volume of these appeals will require that deans will serve as chairs of these disciplinary boards of review.  BG Carter handed out the Standard Operating Procedures under which these boards will function.

 

 

AGENDA ITEM #5: BUDGET

 

BG Carter reported that the 2004-05 budget will be discussed at the next meeting of the Board of Visitors.  He indicated that at this time no information is available regarding the funding requests related to the increase in the fall 2004 freshman class.  The issue of compensation for adjunct faculty was raised.  COL Bebensee indicated that he and COL Fallon had worked on this issue, but thus far, only anecdotal data had been gathered.

 

 

AGENDA ITEM # 6: SALARY ANALYSIS

 

BG Carter indicated that he would be meeting with the consultant hired by the College to review employee salaries.  He indicated that Fall 2004 Salary data was being used and that the consultant was being provided current salaries, date of hiring, and dates for tenure/promotion.  BG Carter indicated that the salary increases recommended last fall by deans/department heads had also been provided to the consultant.

 

 

AGENDA ITEM # 7: FACULTY RETIREMENT FUNCTIONS

 

BG Carter reminded the Board of the retirement function on Thursday, 22 April, in the Riverview Room.  Pat Ezell, Hack Ezell, Charles Cleaver, and Ed Davis will be honored.

 

 

AGENDA ITEM # 8: QEP/SACS

 

BG Carter reported that Dr. Ed Rugg, Chair of the SACS visiting team, had sent a preliminary team report and that The Citadel had been asked to review the report for errors in fact only.  BG Carter reminded the Board of the assignments handed out at the specially called meeting of the Board at 11:00AM on Thursday, 1 April.  At that meeting, BG Carter reviewed the findings of the SACS visiting team relative to the compliance audit and the QEP.  BG Carter reported that The Citadel had met all compliance standards except Core Requirement 5 and Comprehensive Standard M16.  Relative to CR5, BG Carter explained that the visiting team felt the College had demonstrated compliance with some parts of this requirement, but not with all parts.  The visiting Committee has recommended (this really means “is required to”) that The Citadel document that its planning and evaluation processes result in continuing improvement for the institution.  Similarly with standard M16, the visiting Committee felt that The Citadel was in compliance with some parts of the standard but recommended that The Citadel provide evidence that it uses its assessment results for improvement of its educational programs and its administrative and educational support services.

 

For the 13 April Board meeting, BG Carter had asked each dean and department head to make a list of changes made since the last SACS visit that had resulted in improving the quality of the program or programs offered.  BG Carter provided the following format for presenting these changes.

 

CSM16 Format

 

I.          Description of the Improvement

 

·        Be specific

 

·        What changes

 

·        What resources were required (if appropriate)

 

II.        Rationale of the Improvement

 

·        What led to the change

 

·        Connect to an assessment/evaluation process if possible

 

·        External evaluations are acceptable

 

III.       Strategic Initiative

 

·        Indicate which of the BOV 2002-2012 Strategic Initiatives this improvement supports.  List those that are appropriate.

 

IV.       How is the Program Better

 

·        Be specific

 

·        Use measures if possible

 

·        What can students/faculty/staff/etc., do now that they could not do before this improvement.

 

·        Or what can they do better

 

COL Metts pointed out that the presentation of each change must “stand alone” in presenting a convincing case for program improvement.  The readers would only have what The Citadel is presenting this time to convince them that the College is in compliance with standard M16.  COL White urged the members of the Board to “keep their audience in mind” as they present their convincing cases.  The reports must be short enough to keep the reader’s interest, but of sufficient length to convince the reader that changes were made that resulted in improvement of  program quality and/or student learning.

 

 

AGENDA ITEM #9: FACULTY PROCESSION

 

BG Carter reminded the Board that the College of Graduate and Professional Studies commencement is scheduled for 2:00 PM on Sunday, 2 May.  Departments and schools who offer programs through the College of Graduate and Professional Studies should be represented. 

 

BG Carter reminded the Board that approximately one-half of the faculty would be expected at the Cadet Commencement on Saturday, 8 May.  The names of those faculty who will be attending should be sent to Edith Kaufman by noon on Wednesday, 21 April.

 

 

AGENDA ITEM # 10: SUMMER COMPENSATION POLICY

 

LTC Ezell provided a copy of the policy on summer compensation.  BG Carter reminded the Board that this policy is on The Citadel’s web pages.  He urged that this policy be discussed with those members of the faculty who will be teaching summer school so that there will be no last minute issues regarding pay.

 

 

AGENDA ITEM # 11: OTHER MATTERS

 

COL Finch reported that all Provost candidates had been interviewed and that the search committee would be meeting to discuss their recommendation to the President.

 

MAJ Nesmith noted that PANCHO would be available for grade submission on 19 April.  She provided a handout on the deadlines for entering grades:

 

EVENING CLASSES

Graduate                                                                      10:00 AM, Tuesday, 27 April 2004

 

Graduating Undergraduate Students                              10:00 AM, Friday, 30 April 2004

 

Non-graduating Undergraduate Students                       5:00 PM, Thursday, 6 May 2004

 

DAY CLASSES

Graduating Undergraduate Students                              10:00 AM, Wednesday, 5 May 2004

 

Non-graduating Undergraduate Students                       5:00 PM, Thursday, 6 May 2004

 

 

MAJ Zuraw provided the following information regarding Faculty Council membership and the election of new members:

 

The following representatives are completing their first term on the Council.  They can be re-elected for a second term or another member of the school/department can be elected.

 

Representative                                                  School/Department

David Allen                                                      English

Elba Andrade                                                   Modern Languages

Bill Bloss                                                          Political Science/Criminal Justice

Harry Davakos                                                Health, Exercise and Sport Science

Eric Niksch                                                      Army

John Snively                                                     Navy

Bill Woolsey                                                     Business Administration

Kent Murray                                                    Education

 

The following representatives are completing their second term on the Council.  They cannot serve another term.  Another representative needs to be chosen by the department.

 

Representative                                                  Department

Pat Briggs                                                         Physics

Darin Matthews                                                Psychology

Jane Bishop                                                      History

Lisa Zuraw                                                       Chemistry

 

The new Council has its first meeting on May 6th. 

 

Dr. Zuraw reported that the Faculty Council would be reconsidering the Faculty Code of Ethics.  Dr. Zuraw asked if the status of the SACS visit would be reported to the Faculty and about the status of the search committee for the Dean of Science and Mathematics.  BG Carter indicated that both issues are being addressed.

 

LTC John Moore asked if the Federal Express box could be moved to a less conspicuous location on campus.

 

There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 1645.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Isaac S. Metts, Jr., Ph.D.

Associate Vice President

    for Academic Affairs